2 votes
Accepted

Where is the legacy BIOS stored on a UEFI system?

The legacy BIOS code is usually stored compressed in the UEFI filesystem. You can find it in UEFITool by looking for the magic string IFE$ (49 46 45 24) - signature of the EFI_COMPATIBILITY16_TABLE ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
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2 votes
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SPI device sniffing/mirror feature

If this Linux distribution does support LD_PRELOAD you can easily use this feature to override opening/closing/reading/writing/ioctl-ing functions to this specific device. See here for very basic ...
w s's user avatar
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2 votes

SPI Flash, how to find the System memory addresses?

I'm not too familiar with eCos, but my guess is that device address is not a memory address but the address of the hardware device used to access the SPI chip by the OS and bootloader, i.e. something ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
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1 vote

Reverse Engineering BIOS (AMI A0.57)

After extracting the ROM image from the update, UEFITool parses it fine for me:
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
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1 vote

Dump Headunit Software

Dumping the flash is probably the quickest way to start. You can then inspect the dump for any code, images, or data tables. If that fails you may have to dump the internal flash of the chips or try ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
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1 vote

How to dump firmware from ATWINC1510

In the datasheet that you provided are links to more reference documents. One of them is ATWINC1500 Wi-Fi Network Controller Software Design Guide. In chapter 13 is described the WINC Serial Flash ...
Rok Tavčar's user avatar
1 vote

SD card microcontroller

The SD card controllers are usually embedded deeply into the card and do not offer easy access to their firmware (SPI or otherwise). However, they may have undocumented backdoor commands over the SD ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
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