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As you said, .pyc files begin with a magic (per python version)+timestamp. The tools sometimes fail reading these files despite them being correctly structured. Anyhow, this metadata is not required for decompiling. If you can get to the beginning of the marshal'd code, usually at offset 8 from the beginning of the .pyc file, you can use python's built-in ...


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There are ways to make a Python program hard to reverse engineer. Its' possible but you need to fiddle with the Python source code (which is written in C) and compile a special build for your purpose. The way Python works is fully documented and open-source. For instance, consider the pyc file format. Much of the code which deals with reading/writing pyc's ...


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Get Themida. Just go to that page and look at the huge list of features... You will take your executable you built with Cython, and then input that into Themida. You have a bunch of different obfuscation options. Themida will heavily influence size and performance of the application, but a compromise can be made. I don't work for or endorse Themida/Oreans, ...


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You can create a library on c/c++ and encrypt the memory access, however, with a debugger at the end the memory can be read. Notice that with the python module inspect you can not inspect native c/c++ libraries


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Adding a new PE section is the main approach I take when I significantly modify a PE file. There are position and RVA and VA-specific dependencies in existing binaries. Changing those things is challenging, especially if the base relocation table is missing or corrupted for whatever reason. Let's take a look at the general approach I take in Windows PE ...


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