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14

IANAL; If this is done by a company, you need to consult a lawyer that specializes in the field of computer law before taking any action. Most reverse engineering restrictions actually come from the EULA/Terms of service and other contractual binding agreements between the software provider and the user. Often times Clean room methodologies are used to ...


6

Short answer: don't ask us, ask a lawyer. Long answer: Noone, not even a lawyer, will be able to give you any sound advice without knowing the specifics of your situation, which include the country you live in. There's no European law that supersedes the law of each state, like Federal Law in the U.S. does, each country is responsible for turning EU ...


5

You should ask a lawyer about legal questions -- I am not one, and my understanding of this topic is not more valuable than an actual lawyer's. That said, to my knowledge: generally speaking, for someone to land in legal trouble for reverse engineering, they either need to have: Committed an offense that the law lays out as being criminal, in which case ...


4

I am not a lawyer. Basing your actions on anything I've written will be at your own risk. If searching for legal advice you should really consult an expert in the relevant legal field instead of community-driven sites First of all, cracking a program is not the same as finding a vulnerability in it. Although cracking a program may cause financial damages to ...


3

In Australia, you need to have a valid license for the software and be reversing for "compatibility" purposes. Which is pretty wide and includes investigating a security issue. Obviously if the code is available from the vendor, you need to get hold of that source code instead of reversing.


3

Legality of decompilation depends on the EULA (End User License Agreement) of the binary you wish to work with. While Open Source License Agreements like GPL may allow to edit/decompile the binary, other closed source proprietary agreements will prevent you in most cases. That being said decompiling is always legal to somewhat a limited extend according to ...


2

Disclaimer: IANAL. Usually the answer is "it depends." Are you creating a derivative commercial game? Probably not so legal. Are you doing that to be "compatible" with that game? It's legal. Are you just researching the internals of the game? It's legal. For example: I know people who ported game engines by reverse engineering and even copying parts by ...


1

You should check the EFF's FAQ on RE


1

I (a random bloke on the internet) would do these: read the EULA and terms&conditions. Do they explicitly prohibit/allow all/some parts of the API? is the API you're using internal or merely undocumented? depending on the country/jurisdiction you might not be able to use the results of RE. It can be questionable how much of an RE it is to guess the API ...


1

Up to my knowledge, reverse-engineering is possible in Europe if you need it to achieve inter-interoperability and that the maker of the software or the hardware refuse to do it. It means that, if you cannot get a graphic card to work properly under your favorite operating-system and that the maker of this card does not want to make a support for it, then ...


1

An interesting and obvious question pertains to either the 1/2 or full automation of the clean room design process -- as an application of Artificial Intelligence (particularly, the AI fields of program synthesis/analysis and natural language processing). This is not just an idle or academic question: I am rushing headlong into the creation and deployment ...


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