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4

The data are floating point encoded on 32 bits Little_endian byte 0 to 3: 00 00 00 00 = 0 channel number byte 4 to 7: 1f 85 a3 41 = 0x41a3851f = 20.4400005341 etc .. https://www.h-schmidt.net/FloatConverter/IEEE754.html


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This one's actually pretty simple. From_Base58('123456789ABCDEFGHJKLMNPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijkmnopqrstuvwxyz',true) Rotate_right(2,false) From_Base85('0-9a-zA-Z.\\-:+=^!/*?&<>()[]{}@%$#') I think how I did this one was noticing the lack of punctuation in the initial string. From there I believe I just used the magic operation to get the next 2 ...


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Run a histogram. Use the known text as a crib. int chr count 48 0 0 49 1 8 50 2 11 51 3 12 52 4 7 53 5 13 54 6 11 55 7 9 56 8 17 57 9 9 58 : 0 59 ; 0 60 < 0 61 = 0 62 > 0 63 ? 0 64 @ 0 65 A 14 66 B 6 67 C 14 68 D 4 69 E 14 70 F 6 71 G 5 72 H 18 73 I ...


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Since you are dealing with a dot Net application, this will be super easy. As dot Net application are 'compiled' using an Intermediate Language (IL), you may be able to recover something very close to the original source code. If the binary is not obfuscated/protected, you just have to open-up your application in a .NET editor. DnSpy is the one that I find ...


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Without reverse engineering, it may be difficult to guess what are these data. However, you can harvest many packets then diff/observe them to determine the size of data filed, which data remain, which data changes...


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solution ,first need to reverse imei array (without F in packet1) and need Addition byte by byte and output need to Addition with 31, thanks


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Here's my go to in Python3: bytes.fromhex('020a0d') From there you can interpret how you'd like. Python 3.7.6 (default, Dec 30 2019, 19:38:26) >>> hex_str = '020a0d' >>> bytes.fromhex(hex_str) b'\x02\n\r' >>> As an aside, I've found that storing things as ASCII Hex is one of the better RE habits I've gotten into. You can share ...


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