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17

It depends on what your budget is like. The best USB analyzers are hardware devices with good protocol dissectors. If you have a huge budget you can go with the various solutions from LeCroy such as the LeCroy Voyager M3i. If you have a decent size budget and you only need USB 2.0, I would go for the Ellisys USB Explorer 200. If you want to replay and change ...


9

In addition to Peter Andersson's list of tools, you may also want to consider USBTrace and Bus Hound.


7

If you aren't afraid to get your hands dirty, on Windows you could always write a filter driver on top of or below the device object for the dongle. The IoAttachDevice() function and the three other functions starting with that name are your friend. The advantage of that is to have a complete in-software solution for the problem without the expenses involved ...


7

Tho maybe not directly what you are looking for I'd just like to add one item to Peter Andersson's thorough answer. Travis Goodspeed's facedancer (some more recent info ). Its design is also open source. Facedancer Board, a tool for implementing USB devices in host-side Python using the GoodFET framework. Access to the USB chip is extremely low-level, so ...


2

Reverse Engineering has always been about finding the right place to start. There are two common options here: Prevent activation checks For activation purposes, its most likely the best way to search for references to a string related to activation. In this particular case, I would use a decent decompiler like BinaryNinja, IDA or radare2 to find references ...


1

As expected, the USB was indeed detected but due that Linux has no idea how to deal with it without a proper driver, it only parses its hardware related parameters (Vendor and Product IDs) and stops there. Here are the USB device's entries in usb-devices and lsusb commands respectively: # usb-devices [...] T: Bus=01 Lev=02 Prnt=05 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 8 ...


1

For my knowledge , HASP has a USB pen with something inside and two different drivers running as a service to accept remote and local request of license verification... And the other one is something I do not recall . Probably you could sniff protocol (port 1943 for example) . Sorry but I had not access to the phisical USB pen Probably you can also clone ...


1

It could be a TLS callback. Some debuggers have an option to break earlier. I suggest you use procmon to see who and when an handle is opened for your USB dongle.


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