12

It was made by humans so there's a spec. I googled it. Here's a manual which talks about the Axial MX from Accom ~2005. If it's a series of edit controllers, they'll likely work the same under the hood and use the same protocol from one version to the next. Looks like an RS422 Serial. So you just need to hook it up to a computer with a serial port and take ...


5

You may want to start with something simple like monitoring the API calls the controller application is doing. I'm not sure how old your Windows version is but it might be worth giving API Monitor a try. It gives you a good start to monitoring the application at least and you get to trivially see how it interacts with the operating system. Essentially what ...


1

In most cases - yes, you probably have enough information to determine the algorithm, especially if the checksum algorithm is standard(just try to compute all well-known 32 bit checksums on some data samples and see if it fits). However there are some assumptions in this claim: You have many pairs with different data and its checksum You really know all ...


1

I don't want to stop anyone from reverse engineering stuff cuz I certainly do things all the time when they aren't necessary, BUT it sort of sounds like you're shaving a yak (phrase was learned from another RE answer). I'd suggest buying a cheap remote control that is programmable and lookup your devices on the package insert. Then if you really want, you ...


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