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It is rather C++ question, but nonetheless: what you see is an assignment operator for the class QString. It enables you to write things like a = b, where a, b are of QString type. The reason why it returns value is to enable you to write: a = b = c instead of a = c and b = c and you may see this pattern in case of other operators overloading (see question ...


3

Regarding unaff_ and in_ prefixes (source): in or unaff : this typically indicates that a register is read before it is written (and it does not contain a parameter passed to the function) So, if you encounter them in decompilator, it means that their values are used before they are initialised in the function (they contain the values assigned earlier, in ...


1

The default assignment operator for primitives returns a value, and the standard convention for operator overloading is to not deviate from the behavior of the operator you are overloading. This is why it's good practice to continue to return the assigned reference from the assignment overload operator. Because of this behavior, there's a well-used idiom in ...


1

IDA’s C parser does not handle some C++ syntax like namespaces. There are two options: Rename the local type or struct to have no “wrong” symbols, you can use it in type declaration then Use “Convert to struct*” context menu command on the argument/variable. This bypasses the C parser and sets the type directly.


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