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General purpose programming language that uses the procedural and structured programming paradigm.

21
votes
Short answer: No. Long answer: On the (Im)possibility of Obfuscating Programs by Boaz Barak, Oded Goldreich, Rusell Impagliazzo, Steven Rudich, Amit Sahai, Salil Vadhan, and Ke Yang. Medium answer: …
answered Mar 20 '13 by perror
1
vote
It is just a function that perform a simple addition: int add(int *i, int *j) { return *i + *j; }
answered Oct 29 '18 by perror
2
votes
Basically, the original C code associated with this assembly code would be: if (strcmp (str1, str2)) // call strcmp and do the 'test eax, eax' goto error; // str1 != str2 --> jne 1706 // str1 … == str2 // Do legitimate code error: // Do what you need to handle the error If you want a way to remember what does test eax, eax it can be translated like this in C: bool test = (eax == 0) Note …
answered Sep 3 '18 by perror
0
votes
Because, this technique would require to rewrite the code of the program... And, most of the time, you cannot rewrite the .text section... You only have access to the data stored in the stack and/or …
answered Sep 23 '14 by perror
3
votes
Just to add on Sigtran answer, part of the assembly code you are pinpointing is coming from the stack-smashing protection. It seems that you have it enabled by default on your system. Try to recompil …
answered Aug 11 '17 by perror
5
votes
In fact, the memory layout within gdb and outside of it differs of a few bytes. There have been recently a question about this here. You can read: How to predict address space layout differences betwe …
answered Nov 1 '13 by perror
6
votes
My first idea would be to perform a frequency analysis on aligned bytes. For most of the assembly languages, the most relevant bytes are aligned on the most significant bits. So it might be quite ea …
answered Mar 24 '13 by perror
6
votes
First of all, you have to understand that there is a specification for all these things. These specifications differ from one assembly language to another and from one operating system to the other. …
answered Jul 21 '18 by perror
6
votes
advise you to read "Exploiting Format String Vulnerabilities" from Scut (2001) to get a whole grasp on these kind of manipulations. Are they other languages than C/C++ that are vulnerable to these bugs …
answered May 30 '14 by perror