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You can use a disassembler to go from binary opcodes to assembly code.

For example ndisam command is able to do this.

If you have the following binary opcodes (hex view of file):

31C0FFC0C3

You will get the following output when disassembling it with ndisasm:

00000000  31C0              xor ax,ax
00000002  FFC0              inc ax
00000004  C3                ret

Where the first column is the file offset, the second is the binary opcodes and the final row is the assembly code.

You could then get the second column and get the string length of it and divide by 2 and you would have the length of the instruction in bytes.

You can use a disassembler to go from binary opcodes to assembly code.

For example ndisam command is able to do this.

You can use a disassembler to go from binary opcodes to assembly code.

For example ndisam command is able to do this.

If you have the following binary opcodes (hex view of file):

31C0FFC0C3

You will get the following output when disassembling it with ndisasm:

00000000  31C0              xor ax,ax
00000002  FFC0              inc ax
00000004  C3                ret

Where the first column is the file offset, the second is the binary opcodes and the final row is the assembly code.

You could then get the second column and get the string length of it and divide by 2 and you would have the length of the instruction in bytes.

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source | link

You can use a disassembler to go from binary opcodes to assembly code.

For example ndisam command is able to do this.