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While reading an answer to another questionan answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file.

Thanks in advance.

While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file.

Thanks in advance.

While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file.

Thanks in advance.

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While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature. The only place I could find this information was in a Stackoverflow answer here.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file. 

Thanks in advance.

While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature. The only place I could find this information was in a Stackoverflow answer here.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file.

Thanks in advance.

While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file. 

Thanks in advance.

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Where could one find a collection of mid-file binary signatures?

While reading an answer to another question, it was mentioned that "78 9C" was a well-known pattern for Zlib compressed data. Intrigued, I decided to search up the signature on the file signature database to see if there were any related numbers. It wasn't on there. So I checked on Gary Kessler's magic number list to see that it wasn't there either.

I even ended up creating a binary file with the signature at the beginning and ran "file" on it as a sort of "I-doubt-it-will-work-but-maybe" attempt (Since that works with "50 4b" because that is a valid ZIP file header and is commonly in the middle of other files.) But none of these attempts revealed that I was looking at a Zlib signature. The only place I could find this information was in a Stackoverflow answer here.

It would appear as though most magic number databases only contain file-format magic numbers rather than numbers to differentiate data in the middle of a file. So, my question is:

Are there any places one could find a list of binary signatures of certain types of data streams that are not file formats themselves? Data that is not a file itself, but rather inside a file.

Thanks in advance.