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Your best bet is to use an environment (eg FireFox) in which eval()eval() can be overridden by using a proxy function, and the function just prints the output. That way, there is no risk in missing anything, even if the malware aliases it. Unfortunately, eval()eval() is not designed to be overridden (and I believe is explicitly forbidden by recent ECMAScript spec), but at worst it will fail to run.

Your best bet is to use an environment (eg FireFox) in which eval() can be overridden by using a proxy function, and the function just prints the output. That way, there is no risk in missing anything, even if the malware aliases it. Unfortunately, eval() is not designed to be overridden (and I believe is explicitly forbidden by recent ECMAScript spec), but at worst it will fail to run.

Your best bet is to use an environment (eg FireFox) in which eval() can be overridden by using a proxy function, and the function just prints the output. That way, there is no risk in missing anything, even if the malware aliases it. Unfortunately, eval() is not designed to be overridden (and I believe is explicitly forbidden by recent ECMAScript spec), but at worst it will fail to run.

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Your best bet is to use an environment (eg FireFox) in which eval() can be overridden by using a proxy function, and the function just prints the output. That way, there is no risk in missing anything, even if the malware aliases it. Unfortunately, eval() is not designed to be overridden (and I believe is explicitly forbidden by recent ECMAScript spec), but at worst it will fail to run.