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I believe binwalk gave false postive output

It is likely the output is not false positive. You can see the strings used in certificates.

For instance I know that there are firmwares that are packed/unpacked and/or encrypted/unencrypted

This is the direction you would want to check. Binwalk has an entropy analysis option, and it can display a graph of it. Encrypted or packed files will have high and uniform entropy.

I'm tryring to extract the firmware so I can use QEMU and try to do some vulnerability findings.

DeviceWhile the CPU architecture might be well-known, device like this will likely have a custom CPUSoC with little to none available documentation. I don't think you will be to do a complete emulation of the device, so static analysis can be a preferred option.

Can someone point me in the direction

If you really have JTAG access, you can try dumping RAM, since it may contain unpacked/decrypted code. However, I suspect this is in fact a dump of SPI flash chip. Actual JTAG access may have been disabled by manufacturer.

I believe binwalk gave false postive output

It is likely the output is not false positive. You can see the strings used in certificates.

For instance I know that there are firmwares that are packed/unpacked and/or encrypted/unencrypted

This is the direction you would want to check. Binwalk has an entropy analysis option, and it can display a graph of it. Encrypted or packed files will have high and uniform entropy.

I'm tryring to extract the firmware so I can use QEMU and try to do some vulnerability findings.

Device like this will likely have a custom CPU with little to none available documentation. I don't think you will be to do a complete emulation of the device, so static analysis can be a preferred option.

Can someone point me in the direction

If you really have JTAG access, you can try dumping RAM, since it may contain unpacked/decrypted code. However, I suspect this is in fact a dump of SPI flash chip. Actual JTAG access may have been disabled by manufacturer.

I believe binwalk gave false postive output

It is likely the output is not false positive. You can see the strings used in certificates.

For instance I know that there are firmwares that are packed/unpacked and/or encrypted/unencrypted

This is the direction you would want to check. Binwalk has an entropy analysis option, and it can display a graph of it. Encrypted or packed files will have high and uniform entropy.

I'm tryring to extract the firmware so I can use QEMU and try to do some vulnerability findings.

While the CPU architecture might be well-known, device like this will likely have a custom SoC with little to none available documentation. I don't think you will be to do a complete emulation of the device, so static analysis can be a preferred option.

Can someone point me in the direction

If you really have JTAG access, you can try dumping RAM, since it may contain unpacked/decrypted code. However, I suspect this is in fact a dump of SPI flash chip. Actual JTAG access may have been disabled by manufacturer.

1
source | link

I believe binwalk gave false postive output

It is likely the output is not false positive. You can see the strings used in certificates.

For instance I know that there are firmwares that are packed/unpacked and/or encrypted/unencrypted

This is the direction you would want to check. Binwalk has an entropy analysis option, and it can display a graph of it. Encrypted or packed files will have high and uniform entropy.

I'm tryring to extract the firmware so I can use QEMU and try to do some vulnerability findings.

Device like this will likely have a custom CPU with little to none available documentation. I don't think you will be to do a complete emulation of the device, so static analysis can be a preferred option.

Can someone point me in the direction

If you really have JTAG access, you can try dumping RAM, since it may contain unpacked/decrypted code. However, I suspect this is in fact a dump of SPI flash chip. Actual JTAG access may have been disabled by manufacturer.